Germany And Russia Agreement

Between January 1940 and the date of the German raid, the USSR exported goods to Germany with an estimated total value of DM 597.9 million. German deliveries amounted to DM 437.1 million. [1] The agreements continued Nazi-Soviet economic relations and led to the delivery to Germany of large quantities of raw materials, including more than 900,000 tons of oil, 1,600,000 tons of grain and 140,000 tons of manganese ore. The public part of the Moscow agreement was announced with great commotion on August 25, 1939, the day Hitler had planned to launch his “blitzkrieg” (rapid and surprising attacks) eastward to Poland. But earlier on the same day, Britain and France reacted, knowing that the Soviet Nazi agreement was in default by forming their promise to Poland in a treaty in which they declared that everyone would fight to defend Poland if it was attacked. In August 1940, the Soviet Union temporarily suspended its deliveries under its trade agreement, following disagreements over policy in Romania, the Soviet war with Finland, Germany`s relapse into its supplies of goods under the pact, and Stalin`s fear that Hitler`s war with the West would end soon after France signed a ceasefire. they were tense. [221] The suspension resulted in serious resource problems for Germany. [221] By the end of August, relations improved again, with countries redrawing the Hungarian and Romanian borders and settling some Bulgarian claims, and Stalin was once again convinced that Germany would face a long war in the West with the improvement of Britain`s aerial struggle with Germany and the implementation of an agreement between the United States and Britain on destroyers and bases. [222] Subsequently, it was agreed to establish a policy of transit through Soviet territory of goods purchased by Germany from third countries.

The countries followed the agreement and resolved other issues with the German-Soviet border and trade agreement of January 10, 1941. In June 1941, Germany invaded the Soviet Union in violation of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939 and all economic agreements between the two countries ended. The agreement left the world perplexed. John Gunther recalled in Moscow in August 1939 that the news of the August 19 trade agreement surprised journalists and diplomats during the Soviet Franco-British negotiations, but made them hope for peace in the world. They did not expect the announcement of the non-aggression pact on August 21: “There is no more incredible to imagine . . .